18/8/2017 - Driverless Cars Could Turn N.Y.C. Into A City Of Tiny Parks

18/8/2017 - Renewable Energy Transition Strategies

18/8/2017 - “Smart” bench gathers data to help urban planners meet public’s needs

17/8/2017 - Great idea: Public housing that engages the city

17/8/2017 - Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Challenges are Creating Smart Cities

17/8/2017 - Construction begins on the World’s First Vertical Forest City

16/8/2017 - Cities: Good or evil?

16/8/2017 - The Power of the Platform in Smart Cities

16/8/2017 - Transforming Barcelona by imagining the future

15/8/2017 - 50 Real IoT success stories after ten years of experience in the market

15/8/2017 - One year on: Is the urban agenda a golden opportunity?

15/8/2017 - Workshop on the Silver Economy for cities and regions

14/8/2017 - Why Smart Cities Will Have to Get a Lot Smarter

14/8/2017 - Join the IUC city-to-city cooperation programme

14/8/2017 - How can conflict-affected cities become better hosts to refugees?

13/8/2017 - Why small cities can generate big ideas

13/8/2017 - What refugees living in cities need

13/8/2017 - Ten Fold and the mobile house of the future

12/8/2017 - All cities welcome to the URBACT City Festival – register now!

12/8/2017 - Three Generations of Evolving Smart Cities

12/8/2017 - 'Junk play': urban adventure playgrounds hit by austerity

11/8/2017 - London's first dockless hire bike scheme launches

11/8/2017 - In England, closing streets to cars so kids can play

11/8/2017 - #SmartCityTrends: Data needs a ‘banker'

10/8/2017 - PROSPECT - Peer-powered cities and regions has been launched!

10/8/2017 - How Can Small Businesses Create Safer Communities?

10/8/2017 - City managers debate governance of smart city strategies

9/8/2017 - The Age of Customer.gov

9/8/2017 - Chongqing, China: Revitalizing urban growth, sustainably

9/8/2017 - The slow lane: Dutch app allows elderly to 'hack' traffic lights

8/8/2017 - The emerging landscape of urban living labs

8/8/2017 - African cities – the future of technology?

8/8/2017 - Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity for Older Persons in Cities

7/8/2017 - Lessons from five cities on urban food policy

7/8/2017 - Paris launches trial of autonomous shuttle bus service

7/8/2017 - Book: Smart Rules for Smart Cities

6/8/2017 - How Much Can Cities Do About Walkability?

6/8/2017 - Only 20 nations use 91% of global energy

6/8/2017 - How can we manage our ever-expanding cities?

5/8/2017 - Connecting Palestinian cities for a more sustainable future

5/8/2017 - What characterises an ideal city, and how do we get there?

5/8/2017 - New Kensington starts smart city transformation counting trees

4/8/2017 - Linking People and Places: New ways of understanding spatial access in cities

4/8/2017 - Does nature stand a chance in this urbanisation frenzy?

4/8/2017 - Oslo's car ban sounded simple enough. Then the backlash began

3/8/2017 - The Delhi Metro: How do you build a transport system for 26m people?

3/8/2017 - What Inclusive Urban Development Can Look Like

3/8/2017 - New D.C. Lab Wants to Use Big Data to Shape City Policy

2/8/2017 - Leading Cities in a World of Disruptive Innovation

2/8/2017 - Save the date! First SUMPs-Up workshop in Torres Vedras, Portugal

2/8/2017 - Finding Your Place in the Global Urban Movement to Fight Climate Change

1/8/2017 - The Future is Coming: Cities Readiness Rating

1/8/2017 - Making Cities More Dense Always Sparks Resistance. Here’s How to Overcome It.

1/8/2017 - 54th International Making Cities Livable Conference


 

Driverless Cars Could Turn N.Y.C. Into A City Of Tiny Parks


What cities look like in the age of autonomous cars? For starters, we’ll have a lot more street space.
When the driverless car revolution arrives, how will it transform the city–and what can we do to prepare for it now?
For the New York-based architecture and urban design firm FXFOWLE, that means redesigning the street space that’s currently occupied by parked cars. The firm’s design concept, Public Square, imagines a future where the edges of city streets are reclaimed as public space. The proposal recently won the Driverless Future Challenge–a competition run by Blank Space and the city of New York, focused on the urban implications of autonomous cars.
https://www.fastcodesign.com/90133435/driverless-cars-could-turn-n-y-c-into-a-city-of-tiny-parks

Renewable Energy Transition Strategies


Are you working to advance urban energy initiatives?  Then you might be interested in a brand new online course offered by SFU's Faculty of Environment and supported by our team.
Renewable Energy Transition Strategies: Practical Innovations for Urban Areas is a cutting edge and 30-hour program beginning October 2017 that can be undertaken from any part of the world. It's aimed at professionals working in local and regional governments, researchers, and members of civil society and the private sector.
The curriculum, built around ten different modules, covers topics ranging from building energy efficiency to transportation to policy to community engagement and beyond.
http://www.sfu.ca/fenv/professional-programs/renewable-energy-transition-online-course/modules.html

“Smart” bench gathers data to help urban planners meet public’s needs


It seems that there is a “smart” version of every basic object nowadays, but an intriguing one for landscape designers who design public spaces is the smart bench.
One example of these smart benches can be found in Anita Stroud Park in Charlotte, North Carolina. The bench attracts many visitors thanks to a pair of USB ports connected to a solar-powered console, suddenly becoming a godsend for those who have a dead or dying phone.
But this feature isn’t really what makes this bench smart. Built in beneath the solar panel is a Wi-Fi enabled sensor that is able to register anyone who walks within 150 feet of the bench with a Wi-Fi enabled mobile device as a unique visitor to the park.
http://www.totallandscapecare.com/landscaping-blog/smart-bench/

Great idea: Public housing that engages the city


Public housing in the form of complete or partial neighborhoods started with HOPE VI and became standard practice, impacting the lives of people in cities and towns across America.
In celebration of the 25th Congress for the New Urbanism, Public Square is running the series 25 Great Ideas of the New Urbanism. These ideas have been shaped by new urbanists and continue to influence cities, towns, and suburbs. The series is meant to inspire and challenge those working toward complete communities in the next quarter century.
https://www.cnu.org/publicsquare/2017/07/27/great-idea-public-housing-engages-city

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Urban Challenges are Creating Smart Cities


Cities have been around for thousands of years, so urbanization is hardly a new phenomenon — but it’s happening now at an unprecedented pace.
In 1950 about 30 percent of the world’s population lived in cities, a number that shot up to nearly 55 percent by 2016 and is expected to hit 60 percent by 2030, according to United Nations statistics. This dramatic growth brings challenges on a variety of fronts, transforming “smart cities” from a catchy phrase into a critical endeavor.
http://www.urenio.org/2017/07/21/research-horizons-magazine-interdisciplinary-approaches-urban-challenges-creating-smart-cities/

Construction begins on the World’s First Vertical Forest City


Liuzhou Forest City in the mountainous region of Guangxi, China has begun its construction. The new ground-up city, which has been designed by Stefano Boeri Architetti, will accommodate up to 30,000 people in a master plan of environmentally efficient structures covered top-to-bottom in plants and trees.
The forest city will consist of all of the essential typologies of the modern city, including offices, houses, hotels, hospitals and schools, housed within a 175-hectare site near the Liujiang River. Employing the firm’s signature vertical forest system, the facades of each building will be covered in plant life with a total 40,000 trees and nearly one million plants from over 100 species specified.
http://www.urbannewsdigest.in/?p=23172

Cities: Good or evil?


In developing nations and emerging markets the rise of the city has been unprecedented in recent decades, and it is in these environments in particular that cities can often be viewed as breeding grounds for poverty and crime, as well as environmental and social degradation.
But in actual fact, they also present the most effective places to promote economic development, social well-being and equality.
The urbanisation of developing countries is occurring at a rate never seen before.
http://www.solomonstarnews.com/viewpoint/private-view/13124-cities-good-or-evil

The Power of the Platform in Smart Cities


The mission of a Smart City is outcomes-based digital transformation. Smart Cities focus on the outcomes of economic development, sustainability, and operational efficiencies using innovation, community engagement, and a connected ecosystem of partners to improve the quality of life for residents. Emerging technologies and technology innovation are key to producing these systemic outcomes; more specifically, Smart Cities must harness the data from smart devices, networks, cloud infrastructure, and applications and analytics to develop new insights as well as new products and services.
https://www.smartresilient.com/idc-technology-spotlight-power-platform-smart-cities

Transforming Barcelona by imagining the future


Our city can be the torchbearer of a fairer economy and a new, progressive urbanism.
The 21st century, it’s been said, won’t be the century of empires or states, but the century of cities. Large cities and metropolitan regions will be on the front line of responding to global phenomena like the tech revolution, climate change, inequalities and urban speculation.
In the past year, the population of Barcelona has grown by 3%. The employment rate is at its highest since 2009, and new businesses, exports and investments are also growing. Many of these changes are being actively supported by the municipal government. But the benefits aren’t always felt by the whole city.
https://www.uclg.org/en/media/news/transforming-barcelona-imagining-future

50 Real IoT success stories after ten years of experience in the market


With the aim to unveil its horizontal approach to the IoT market, Libelium has launched a new white paper to present 50 real smart projects deployed in 120 countries all over the world. The IoT company has summarized its most successful and appealing stories, developed with Libelium technology and its partners’ ecosystem, for the main verticals of the market. The white paper includes real IoT projects for environment care, water management, precision agriculture, smart cities, parking management, smart building, smart factory, logistics, retail and eHealth.
http://www.urenio.org/2017/07/20/libelium-white-paper-50-real-iot-success-stories-ten-years-experience-market/

One year on: Is the urban agenda a golden opportunity?


The Urban Agenda for the EU represents the first time cities have been offered a seat at the table of EU decision making. Yet, its emphasis on informal structures centred on collaboration, deliberately leaves open the question of what precisely this involvement should be.
EUROCITIES has been actively involved since the beginning via the 12 partnerships that are organised on different urban themes. The working method of the Urban Agenda for the EU revolves around recognition of the importance of the local level, the understanding that we have shared urban, and a multi-level governance approach that brings together different levels of government to find share solutions.
http://www.eurocities.eu/eurocities/news/One-year-on-Is-the-urban-agenda-a-golden-opportunity-WSPO-AP9GHY

Workshop on the Silver Economy for cities and regions


How can the Silver Economy help towns and regions match the needs of their ageing population and support local businesses at the same time? If you are interested in this topic, sign up for the workshop on the issue which will take place on 10 October in Brussels, during the European Week of Regions and Cities.
https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/workshop-silver-economy-during-european-week-regions-and-cities

Why Smart Cities Will Have to Get a Lot Smarter


In the future, smart cities will likely bring about many benefits, like less pollution and more efficient transportation systems. But they could also bring about many unintended consequences, according to a panel of speakers at Fortune’s recent Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo.
The group of experts from energy, transportation, government, finance, and other sectors gathered to debate the top-of-mind topic earlier this week. One of the most pressing questions that repeatedly came up was how to keep hackers from breaching increasingly digitized smart grid systems and transportation networks.
http://fortune.com/2017/07/20/smart-cities-will-have-to-get-smarter/

Join the IUC city-to-city cooperation programme


Cities in the Member States of the European Union who wish to exchange with a city facing similar challenges in another region of the world are encouraged to apply for the International Urban Cooperation (IUC) city-to-city cooperation programme on sustainable urban development.
The programme aims to foster links between EU cities (in particular those with more than 50,000 inhabitants) and those in Latin America and the Caribbean, India, Japan, North America, and Asia. Through the programme, local leaders will be able to connect and gain new perspectives on pressing sustainable development issues.
http://www.eumayors.eu/news_en.html?id_news=843

How can conflict-affected cities become better hosts to refugees?


Like many other developing countries, Afghanistan is urbanizing rapidly. Today, a quarter of the country’s over 30 million people live in urban areas, with many more moving to cities to find jobs and lead better lives.
Unlike many other places, though, cities in Afghanistan face an added, complex layer of challenge—conflict.
In Afghanistan, conflict is a major driver of migration into cities. Instability in large areas of the country is forcing refugees and internally displaced people into cities—particularly the capital city of Kabul. The thing is: Kabul doesn’t yet have adequate infrastructure and capacity to effectively host these “newcomers.”
http://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/how-can-conflict-affected-cities-become-better-hosts-refugees-case-afghanistan

 

Why small cities can generate big ideas


In 1990 I moved to East Berlin. I’d rented a room around the corner, as I now know, from the research physicist Angela Merkel. The flat had no phone, so to make calls I had to walk 10 minutes to a phone booth in West Berlin. Later, I got a flat in the west with a shared toilet on the communal staircase and no shower. I soon learnt the codes of Berlin student conversation: “Where do you live? Do you have a shower? Maybe I could come round and shower at yours one day?”

https://www.ft.com/content/396e62c6-4b0a-11e7-919a-1e14ce4af89b

What refugees living in cities need


When Robert Hakiza fled an African war zone, he did what a majority of refugees do these days: He went to a city.
Hakiza left the Democratic Republic of the Congo nine years ago. He went to neighbouring Uganda, where he settled in the capital city of Kampala. At the time, there were about 40,000 refugees, mostly Congolese, living in Kampala. Today, there’s more than 100,000 refugees in a city of 1.5 million.
http://citiscope.org/story/2017/what-refugees-living-cities-need

Ten Fold and the mobile house of the future


Have you ever wanted to move house…literally? Ten Fold Engineering offers you a portable house, ready to unfold and ready to use in just ten minutes. Tired of your new surroundings? You can relocate again, and again…and again. Prices start from £100,000 and the future housing potential of such a system is unlimited in such a fast-moving demanding world.
The Ten Fold initiative innovates by creating and designing various relocatable buildings and structures. Its enormous self-deploy mechanism generates various combinations of space and facilities and it works by using a hand-held battery-powered drill. Different designs have already been imagined in order to meet the needs and desires of the customers, but the process is fully reversible, whenever you feel the need for a change of scenery.
http://urbanizehub.com/ten-fold-mobile-house-future/

All cities welcome to the URBACT City Festival – register now!


Registration is open for the URBACT City Festival on 3-5 October 2017 (link is external), in Tallinn, Estonia! European cities of all sizes, apply now while places are still available – whether you are familiar with URBACT, or discovering this EU programme for the first time.
Under the headline “Good practice – Better Cities” the festival will bring hundreds of urban practitioners and city officials together to improve approaches in sustainable urban development.


http://urbact.eu/all-cities-welcome-urbact-city-festival-register-now

Three Generations of Evolving Smart Cities


During the last decade or so, as the notion of the Smart City became more and more popular, there is a transformation in how some cities manifest the concept. Overall, there seem to have been three distinct phases of how cities have embraced technology and development, moving from tech-company driven, to city government driven, to, finally, citizen driven. In this time, some cities moved from one phase to another linearly, while others have been stuck in one throughout their experiments with smart cities.
http://www.urenio.org/2017/07/19/three-generations-evolving-smart-cities/

'Junk play': urban adventure playgrounds hit by austerity


The oldest adventure playground in Britain is under threat after losing council funding. As public services across the country are cut, is this a sign that cities are becoming increasingly hostile to children?
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jul/19/junk-play-urban-adventure-playgrounds-austerity-london

London's first dockless hire bike scheme launches


Whilst Transport for London's Santander Cycles scheme is expanding to Brixton, making cycling easier and more accessible, private operators have launched dockless bikes in some boroughs without the councils being consulted beforehand.
http://www.polisnetwork.eu/publicnews/1450/45/London-39-s-first-dockless-hire-bike-scheme-launches

In England, closing streets to cars so kids can play


Overweight children. Urban isolation. Neighbours who’ve never spoken to each other. These are the problems being tackled by a free grassroots project encouraging kids all over the England to play in the road.
In the Street Play scheme, groups of parents close residential streets to traffic so their children can come out and play for an hour or two. The parents involved say that it brings both them and their children into contact with people around them they’d otherwise never have known.
http://citiscope.org/partner/2017/england-closing-streets-cars-so-kids-can-play

#SmartCityTrends: Data needs a ‘banker'


Data needs accountability: here’s how it could happen! Fake news, “alternative facts” and filter bubbles – the data we consume and what we read and experience online shapes the way we view the world and the everyday decisions we make, big and small. If data is the new oil, why not start thinking about managing data in a professional way, as we already do for money, gold or stock options?*
https://www.smartscities.com/en/articles/data-needs-a-banker

PROSPECT - Peer-powered cities and regions has been launched!


The PROSPECT project had its kick off meeting last 5-6 of July in Brussels. A three years project bringing together 10 partners from across Europe, PROSPECT will develop a peer-to-peer learning program which will allow more than 180 local authorities, collaborating with their local energy agencies, to discuss and learn from each other on how to better finance the development of energy and climate project for buildings, mobility and lighting and more!
http://www.eurocities.eu/eurocities/news/PROSPECT-Peer-powered-cities-and-regions-has-been-launched-WSPO-APEBBP

How Can Small Businesses Create Safer Communities?


A local coalition is training Oakland’s brick-and-mortar employees in everything from de-escalation tactics to emergency medical care.
Inside a community space in downtown Oakland, Kori Chen learned that a tampon can be used to staunch the blood from a gunshot entrance wound. He also learned about the rights he had at his disposal in case ICE ever tried to conduct a raid inside Red Bay Coffee, the café where Chen works as a director.
https://www.citylab.com/equity/2017/07/how-can-small-businesses-create-safer-communities/534426/

City managers debate governance of smart city strategies


On June 20, at the XII Metropolis World Congress in Montréal, Metropolis and UCLG Learning organized a peer-review session in which City Managers showcased the dealing conflicts between efficient collection and use of data versus privacy protection and prevention of data misuse.
Nowadays, Smart cities have been introduced in different cities world widely. To be a Smart city means gaining information through the use of technology to enable the development of efficient and effective services for citizens.
One of the distinctive phenomena is the open data or open information used as public goods. With the wide use of internet and World Wide Web, open data or open information has become an important tool for the government to create greater transparency and accountability, increase citizen engagement, and drive innovation and economic opportunities.
https://www.metropolis.org/news/2017/city-managers-session

The Age of Customer.gov


The Digital Communities Special Report, which appears twice a year in Government Technology magazine, offers in-depth coverage for local government leaders and technology professionals. The June 2017 report explores the idea that the tech that drives 311 can help government deliver an Amazon-like experience.
http://www.urenio.org/2017/07/18/age-customer-gov/

Chongqing, China: Revitalizing urban growth, sustainably


China is shifting its focus away from urban expansion toward regional revitalization and urban regeneration. Chongqing, a megacity in southwestern China, is exploring ways to regenerate urban growth and build resilient, livable, and sustainable communities.  
What are Chongqing's plans? How will they affect the lives of the city's residents? Watch a video as World Bank Senior Director Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez (@Ede_WBG) and Deputy Director Zhou Tao from the Chongqing Municipal Development and Reform Commission discuss urban regeneration. 
http://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/chongqing-china-revitalizing-urban-growth-sustainably

The slow lane: Dutch app allows elderly to 'hack' traffic lights


With sensors and smartphones to make roads more flexible, Tilburg is addressing the question: how can a city become safer for less able residents?
The distance from Noud Rommen’s front door to the local shops is just 100 yards, but to get there, the 71-year-old with mobility problems must negotiate a six-lane dual carriageway with a notoriously short pedestrian crossing time.
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jul/12/dutch-app-elderly-hack-pedestrian-crossings

The emerging landscape of urban living labs


There is a growing trend to involve citizens in city development to make urban areas more sustainable and livable. The urban living labs approach offers a way to foster new collaborative, trans-disciplinary ways of thinking in urban planning and development, and provides a real-world testing ground for urban innovation and transformation.
http://jpi-urbaneurope.eu/news/urban-living-labs-handbook/

African cities – the future of technology?


Big cities in Africa foster an enormous technological potential. The continent currently has over 300 tech hubs in 93 cities, across 42 of its countries. Startups that accelerate Africa’s technological evolution, such as Andela, provide funding and support for a multitude of initiatives that might end up writing the future of technology.
According to Jeremy Johnson, the founder and CEO of Andela, the continent will emerge as a powerful and highly significant player on the tech scene. Technology and its future potential will be developed, and has already started emerging, in cities such as Nairobi, Lagos or Kampala. 10 years ago, Africa had an unimpressive and somewhat surprising number of 0 hubs, according to the 300 that exist today.
http://urbanizehub.com/african-cities-future-technology/

Eradicating Poverty and Promoting Prosperity for Older Persons in Cities


UN-Habitat cosponsored a side event at the High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development recently held at the UN-Headquarters in New York.
The event mainly focused on making sustainable development work at all ages, with a focus on eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity for older persons.
The side event participants included representatives of Member States, NGOs and UN agencies. Discussions centred on the situation of older persons in different contexts and explore ways of enhancing and mainstreaming ageing issues in support of SDG implementation and promote the rights of older persons, while developing sustainable partnerships.
https://unhabitat.org/eradicating-poverty-and-promoting-prosperity-for-older-persons-in-cities/

Lessons from five cities on urban food policy


Need a recipe for a successful urban food policy? A recent report from the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems, has some ideas.
The report, “What makes urban food policy happen?”, features case studies from five cities on four continents. According to the authors, there are many nutrition-related challenges that municipalities around the world can tackle, from obesity to minimization of food waste. Even developed cities are plagued with food deserts where fast food and unhealthy snacks are the main choices available.
http://citiscope.org/story/2017/lessons-five-cities-urban-food-policy

Paris launches trial of autonomous shuttle bus service


As of the beginning of July, a new driverless, electric shuttle bus service has been running in Paris. The trials are taking place in La Défense, Europe's largest business district.
Free of charge for all users, the service offers three different routes that serve the main areas of La Défense. Two of the routes will operate at 10 minute intervals at peak times during the week, whilst the third will run every 20 minutes at the weekends.
During the first three months of the trial, an operator will remain present in the vehicles. In the second phase, however, they will operate fully autonomously.
http://www.eltis.org/discover/news/paris-launches-trial-autonomous-shuttle-bus-service

Book: Smart Rules for Smart Cities


Contemporary cities cannot be thought of and defined as static systems, as they were in the past, with a few urban functions. New parameters must now be considered together to plan how to reach the desired urban smartness (energy, mobility, waste…). This research provides a new framework and tools an methodologies to measure the impact of Smart Cities.
https://amsterdamsmartcity.com/items/smart-rules-for-smart-cities

How Much Can Cities Do About Walkability?


A lot of what fosters it is out of their control, but a little audacity goes a long way.
Among the many pieces of wisdom in Jane Jacobs’ 1961 masterpiece, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, one stands out a half-century later as a near-universal urban planning truth. It’s the idea that healthy communities are built on the face-to-face contact of their residents. Routine daily meetings of neighbors on the sidewalk foster public safety and social cohesion. “Lowly, unpurposeful and random as they may appear,” Jacobs wrote, “sidewalk contacts are the small change from which a city’s wealth of public life may grow.”
http://www.governing.com/columns/assessments/gov-walkable-cities-chicago-brattleboro.html

Only 20 nations use 91% of global energy


A staggering 91% of the entire planet’s electricity is used by only 20 nations.
The disparity in energy usage is highlighted in new research published by GoCompare Energy, which shows despite there being 196 countries in the world, power output is not distributed evenly.
China consumes around 4,921 terawatt-hours (TWh) each year, followed by the US at 3,848TWh.
This accounts for 24% and 19% of global energy output respectively, far more than India, which placed third on the list with 5% of global usage.
https://www.energylivenews.com/2017/07/18/only-20-nations-use-91-of-global-energy/

How can we manage our ever-expanding cities?


Technological advancements from the IoT to digital energy may be the solution to managing population growth.
Urbanisation has been a geopolitical fact of life since the industrial revolution. As the centres of wealth creation switched from the fields to factories, so too those seeking employment upped sticks and settled in increasingly urbanised areas.
With the global population expected to reach 8.5 billion by 2030 and 9.7 billion by 2050 – by which time it is expected that 70pc of the world’s population will live in cities – managing urbanisation is a critical issue.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/social-innovation/managing-expansion-in-cities/

Connecting Palestinian cities for a more sustainable future


Cities expand in the blink of an eye, and with such rapid growth come corresponding issues. This is immediately apparent when you drive through a Palestinian city and observe the severe traffic problems. While such gridlock may be inconvenient for a person caught in it, it can be a severely damaging for many small business owners, whose shops become inaccessible due to the traffic build-up. Among the main contributing factors to this situation are the weak, under-capacitated urban planning practices in Palestine.
http://blogs.worldbank.org/arabvoices/connecting-palestinian-cities-more-sustainable-future

What characterises an ideal city, and how do we get there?


What do we envision the ideal city of the future to be like? How can we approach such an ideal in urban planning? According to Marco Dall’Orso, the (re)creation of urban environments needs to balance and integrate multiple strategies. Taking into account the quality of the socio-economic and built-natural environment, he develops a framework that can be used to analyse a city’s strengths, weaknesses, and possible trajectories for future development.
http://www.urbanet.info/ideal-city/

New Kensington starts smart city transformation counting trees


The city of New Kensington is beginning its smart city transformation by counting its trees. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Outdoor Corps is collecting the data since July 17 and will continue to do so until July 28.
The initiative is dubbed the Urban Tree Inventory, and will provide the city’s Shade Tree Commission with information that will ultimately help New Kensington plan the management of trees growing on city property and demonstrate the needs of the city when applications for grant funding are in order.
https://smartcitynews.global/new-kensington-starts-smart-city-transformation-counting-trees/

Linking People and Places: New ways of understanding spatial access in cities


A new study released by the International Transport Forum (ITF) examines how recent developments in measuring urban accessibility can be used to inform planning and operational decisions.
http://www.polisnetwork.eu/publicnews/1452/45/Linking-People-and-Places-New-ways-of-understanding-spatial-access-in-cities

Does nature stand a chance in this urbanisation frenzy?


In 2012, Hyderabad became the first Indian city to have a City Biodiversity Index (CBI), at least on paper. As an assessment tool, the Index is an invaluable tool for city authorities to monitor and evaluate biodiversity with a view to aid conservation efforts. Launched amid much fanfare to coincide with Hyderabad hosting the UN Convention on Biodiversity in 2012, the Index is now defunct. It has not been updated or used since its launch by Hyderabad’s civic bodies.
http://citizenmatters.in/steps-to-increase-biodiversity-in-indian-cities-4447

Oslo's car ban sounded simple enough. Then the backlash began


When Oslo decided to be the first European city to ban cars from its centre, businesses protested. So the city did the next best thing: it banned parking
One day late last summer, in Frogner, a central neighbourhood of Oslo, Nils Sandberg received a note.
“It simply stated that shortly, parking spaces in these streets would disappear and bicycle lanes would be built,” says Sandberg. He spoke to neighbours, and learned they had all received the same note. “This came as a total surprise and shock.”
https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jun/13/oslo-ban-cars-backlash-parking

The Delhi Metro: How do you build a transport system for 26m people?


“Thou hath not played rugby until thou hath tried to get onto a Delhi Metro in rush hour,” a wise Yogi once said.
If you’ve never been on New Delhi’s Metro, your mind might conjure up the the conventional image of Indian trains: tawdry carriages, buckets of sweat, people hanging out of windows and the odd holy cow wandering around for good measure.
Well, no. The Delhi Metro is actually one of the most marvellously sophisticated, affordable, timely, and practical public transportation systems out there. On a 45C day in the Indian summer, many a traveller has shed tears of joy on entering the spacious, air-conditioned carriages.
http://www.citymetric.com/transport/delhi-metro-how-do-you-build-transport-system-26m-people-3203

What Inclusive Urban Development Can Look Like


Inclusive prosperity is the idea that the opportunity and benefits of economic growth should be widely shared by all segments of society. Most cities fall well short of that ideal. While urban areas continue to afford new opportunities to employees and businesses from all walks of life, they are increasingly split between wealthy, high-skill knowledge workers and low-paid service workers.
https://hbr.org/2017/07/what-inclusive-urban-development-can-look-like

New D.C. Lab Wants to Use Big Data to Shape City Policy


The city of Washington, D.C., sees your municipality’s chief data officer and will raise you a whole team of social scientists with backgrounds in data science, statistics and economics.
Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the new office Thursday, called (perhaps a little too cutely) The Lab @ DC, to “design policy and program interventions based on theory and evidence from academic research and administrative data; conduct high-quality evaluations to learn how well things work and how to improve government services; and foster a scientific community of practice, engagement and cooperation with experts and stakeholders,” according to a release from the her office. The initiative was made possible with a $3.2 million grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation, and the team plans to tackle city policy on issues from police body cameras and 911 calls to rodent abatement.
https://nextcity.org/daily/entry/washington-dc-lab-big-data-shape-city-policy

Leading Cities in a World of Disruptive Innovation


This 2017 Global Cities report takes a look at the world’s leading cities as well as those that are likely to become more important on the global stage. It includes the Global Cities Index, which examines cities’ performance, and the Global Cities Outlook, which evaluates their potential. Together, the Index and Outlook present a unique lens on the world’s largest and most influential cities and those primed to make a strong impact.
http://www.urenio.org/2017/07/12/cities-2017-leaders-disruptive-innovation/

Save the date! First SUMPs-Up workshop in Torres Vedras, Portugal


The first SUMPs-Up workshop for mobility experts and local authorities will focus on national urban mobility programmes. The event will take place prior to the CIVITAS Forum Conference 2017 on 26 September in Torres Vedras, Portugal.
http://www.polisnetwork.eu/publicnews/1453/45/Save-the-date-33-First-SUMPs-Up-workshop---national-urban-mobility-programmes-26-September-in-Torres-Vedras-Portugal

Finding Your Place in the Global Urban Movement to Fight Climate Change


For Pittsburgh, it’s a focus on improving air quality and creating renewable energy jobs. For Paris, it’s encouraging social mobility and reclaiming pedestrian areas. The common thread in these cities’ climate action plans is a commitment to pledges made by 197 parties in the landmark Paris Agreement.
“The only way to do right by Pittsburghers and Parisians is to abide by the principles of the Paris Agreement, which guarantees the future health and prosperity of both of our cities – and every other city in the world,” wrote Mayors William Peduto and Anne Hidalgo in The New York Times in response to President Donald Trump’s rationale for pulling the United States out of the pact.
http://thecityfix.com/blog/finding-your-place-in-the-global-urban-movement-to-fight-climate-change-ani-dasgupta/

The Future is Coming: Cities Readiness Rating


PwC in Russia presents its special preliminary release of the survey, The Future is Coming: Cities Readiness Rating, which rates major cities and urban agglomerations on their capacity to adopt new technologies.
As part of the survey, we have analysed the readiness of the world’s largest cities to respond to disruptive innovations and to adopt technology-driven solutions across a variety of social sectors, including healthcare, education, security, tourism and culture, transportation, the economy, utilities, urban development and citizen engagement. City readiness was assessed across several parameters, such as technology readiness; the strategies and regulations that support the adoption and use of new infrastructure; the availability of finished prototypes; and the social readiness of citizens to use new technologies.  
http://www.pwc.ru/en/publications/cities-readiness-rating.html

Making Cities More Dense Always Sparks Resistance. Here’s How to Overcome It.


Urban density, done well, has all kinds of benefits. But it means telling the residents of an area that a bunch more people are moving in. And that always generates resistance, sentiment that has taken on the name NIMBY [Not In My Backyard]. Urbanist Brent Toderian, who has worked with numerous cities on densification projects, explains how he thinks about, and deals with, NIMBYs
https://www.vox.com/2017/6/20/15815490/toderian-nimbys

54th International Making Cities Livable Conference


Public places are the essential key to a livable city. Join the International Making Cities Livable Conference to share your achievements and learn from others how we can take back our streets and squares - and in the process, strengthen community, civic engagement, health, and equity. October 2 - 6 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.
http://www.livablecities.org/conferences/54th-conference-santa-fe

 

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Further archived news available on request from: Kate More